Architects – Hang Up Your Capes & Go Back To The Code

Software architecture is often framed as a positive career move for a developer. Organisations tend to promote their strongest technical people into these strategic and supervisory roles. The pay is better, so the lure is obvious.

I progressed into lead architecture roles in the early 00s, having “earned my spurs” as a developer and then tech lead in the 1990s. But I came to realise that, from my ivory tower, I was having less and less influence over the code that got written, and therefore less and less influence over the actual design and architecture of the software.

I could draw as many boxes and arrows as I liked, give as many PowerPoint presentations as I liked, write as many architecture and standards documents as I liked: none of it made much difference. It was like to trying to direct traffic using my mind.

So I hung up my shiny architect cape and pointy architect wizard hat and went back to working directly with developers on real code as part of the team.

Instead of decreeing “Thou shalt…”, I could – as part of a programming pair (and a programming mob, which was quite the thing with me) – instead suggest “Maybe we could…” and then take the keyboard and demonstrate what I meant. On the actual code. That actually got checked in and ended up in the actual product, instead of just in a Word document nobody ever reads.

The breakthrough for me was realising that “big design decisions” vs “small design decisions” was an artificial distinction. Most architecture decisions are about dependencies: what uses what? And “big” software dependencies – microservice A uses microservice B, for example – can be traced to “small” design decisions – a class in microservice A uses a class in microservice B – which can be traced to even “smaller” design decisions – a line of code in the class in microservice A needs a data value from the class in microservice B.

The “big” architecture decisions start in the code. And the code is full of tiny design decisions that have the potential to become “big”. And drawing an arrow pointing from a box labeled “Microservice A” to a box labeled “Microservice B” doesn’t solve the problems.

Try as we might to dictate the components, their roles and their and dependencies in a system up-front, the reality often deviates wildy from what the architect planned. This is how “layered architectures” – the work of the devil – permeated software architecture for so long, despite it being a complete falsehood that they “separate concerns”. (Spoiler Alert: they don’t.)

Don’t get me wrong: I’m all for visualisation and for a bit of up-front planning when it comes to software design. But sooner rather than later, we have to connect with the reality as the code emerges and evolves. And the most valuable service a software architect can offer to a dev team is to be right there with them fighting the complexity and the dependencies – and helping them to make sense of it all – on the front line.

You can offer more value in the long term by mentoring developers and helping them to reason about design and ultimately make better design decisions – “big” or “small” – than attempting to direct the whole effort from 30,000 ft.

Plus, it seems utter folly to me to take your most experienced developers and promote them away from the thing you believe they do well. (And paying them more to have less impact just adds insult to injury.)

 

Author: codemanship

Founder of Codemanship Ltd and code craft coach and trainer

One thought on “Architects – Hang Up Your Capes & Go Back To The Code”

  1. In our team, I was both architect and implementing developer. You say the pay of an architect is better? I wish I’d known that….

    Good article, as ever. Raises some interesting points.

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