Code Craft is Seat Belts for Programmers

Every so often we all get a good laugh when some unfortunate new hire or intern at a major tech company accidentally “deletes Google” on their first day. It’s easy to snigger (because, of course, none of us has ever messed up like that).

The fact is, though, that pointing and laughing when tech professionals make mistakes doesn’t stop mistakes getting made. It can also breed a toxic work culture, where people learn to avoid mistakes by not taking risks. Not taking risks is anathema to innovation, where – by definition – we’re trying stuff we’ve never done before. Want to stifle innovation where you work? Pointing and laughing is a great way to get there.

One of the things I like most about code craft is how it can promote a culture of safety to try new things and take risks.

A suite of good, fast-running unit tests, for example, makes it easier to spot our boos-boos sooner, so we can un-boo-boo them quickly and without attracting attention.

Continuous Integration offers a level of un-doability that makes it easier and safer to experiment, safe in the knowledge that if we mess it up, we can get back to the last version that worked with a simple hard reset.

The micro-cycles of refactoring mean we never stray far from the path of working code. Combine that with fast-running tests and frequent commits, and ambitious and improbable re-architecting of – say – legacy code becomes a sequence of mundane, undo-able and safe micro-rewrites.

And I can’t help feeling – when I see some poor sod getting Twitter Heat for screwing up a system in production – that it was the deficiency in their delivery pipeline that allowed it to happen that was really at fault. The organisation messed up.

Software development’s a learning process. Think about when young children – or people of any age – first learn to use a computer. The fear of “breaking it” often discourages them from trying new things, and this hampers their learning process. never underestimate just how much great innovation happens when someone says “I wonder what happens if I do this…” Remove that fear by fostering a culture of “what if…?” shielded by systems that forgive.

Code craft is seat belts for programmers.

Author: codemanship

Founder of Codemanship Ltd and code craft coach and trainer

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