The 2 Most Critical Feedback Loops in Software Development

When I’m explaining the inner and outer feedback loops of Test-Driven Development – the “wheels within wheels”, if you like – I make the point that the two most important feedback loops are the outermost and the innermost.

feedbackloops

The outermost because the most important question of all is “Did we solve the problem?” The innermost because the answer is usually “No”, so we have to go round again. This means that the code we delivered will need to change, which raises the second most important question; “Did we break the code?”

The sooner we can deliver something so we can answer “Did we solve the problem?”, the sooner we can feedback the lessons learned on the next go round. The sooner we can re-test the code, the sooner we can know if our changes broke it, and the sooner we can fix it ready for the next release.

I realised nearly two decades ago that everything in between – requirements analysis, customer tests, software design, etc etc – is, at best, guesswork. A far more effective way of building the right thing is to build something, get folk to use it, and feedback what needs to change in the next iteration. Fast iterations accelerate this learning process. This is why I firmly believe these days that fast iterations – with all that entails – is the true key to building the right thing.

Continuous Delivery – done right, with meaningful customer feedback drawn from real use in the world world (or as close as we dare bring our evolving software to the real world) – is the ultimate requirements discipline.

Fast-running automated tests that provide good assurance that our code’s always working are essential to this. How long it takes to build, test and deploy our software will determine the likely length of those outer feedback loops. Typically, the lion’s share of that build time is regression testing.

About a decade ago, many teams told me “We don’t need unit tests because we have integration tests”, or “We have <insert name of trendy new BDD tool here> tests”. Then, a few years later, their managers were crying “Help! Our tests take 4 hours to run!” A 4-hour build-and-test cycle creates a serious bottleneck, leading to code that’s almost continuously broken without teams knowing. In other words, not shippable.

Turn a 4-hour build-and-test cycle into a 40-second build-and-test cycle, and a lot of problems magically disappear. You might be surprised how many other bottlenecks in software development have slow-running tests as their underlying cause – analysis paralysis, for example. That’s usually a symptom of high stakes in getting it wrong, and that’s usually a symptom of infrequent releases. “We better deliver the right thing this time, because the next go round could be 6 months later.” (Those among us old enough to remember might recall just how much more care we had to take over our code because of how long it took to compile. It’s a similar effect, but on a much larger scale with much higher stakes than a syntax error.)

Where developers usually get involved in this process – user stories and backlogs – is somewhere short of where they need to be involved. User stories – and prioritised queues of user stories – are just guesses at what an analyst or customer or product owner believes might solve the problem. To obsess over them is to completely overestimate their value. The best teams don’t guess their way to solving a problem; they learn their way.

Like pennies to the pound, the outer feedback loop of “Does it actually work in the real world?” is made up of all the inner feedback loops, and especially the innermost loop of regression testing after code is changed.

Teams who invest in fast-running automated regression tests have a tendency to out-learn teams who don’t, and their products have a tendency to outlive the competition.

 

 

Author: codemanship

Founder of Codemanship Ltd and code craft coach and trainer

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