The Value’s Not In Features, It’s In Learning

A small poll I ran on the Codemanship Twitter account seems to confirm what I’ve observed and heard in the field about “agile” development teams still being largely plan-driven.

If you’re genuinely feedback-driven, then your product backlog won’t survive much further out than the next cycle of customer feedback. Maintaining backlogs that look months ahead is a sign that just maybe you’re incrementally working through a feature list instead of iteratively solving a set of business problems.

And this cuts to the core of a major, fundamental malaise in contemporary Agile Software Development. Teams are failing to grasp that the “value” that “flows” in software development is in what we learn with each iteration, not in the features themselves.

Perhaps a better name for “features” might be “guesses” – we’re guessing what might be needed to solve a problem. We won’t know until we’ve tried, though. So each release is a vital opportunity to test our assumptions and feed back what we learn into the next release.

I see teams vigorously defending their product backlogs from significant change, and energetically avoiding feedback that might reveal that we got it wrong this time. Folk have invested a lot in the creation of their backlog – often envisioning a whole product in significant detail – and can take it pretty personally when the end users say “Nope, this isn’t working”.

With a first release – when our code meets the real world for the first time – I expect a lot of change to a product vision. With learning and subsequent iterations of the design, the product vision will usually stabilise. But when we track how much the backlog changes with each release on most teams, we see mostly tweaking. Initial product visions – which, let’s be clear, are just educated guesses at best – tend to remain largely intact. Once folk are invested in a solution, they struggle to let go of it.

Teams with a strong product vision often suffer from confirmation bias when considering end user feedback. (Remember: the “customer” on many products is just as invested in the product vision if they’ve actively participated in its creation.) Feedback that supports their thesis tends to be promoted. Feedback that contradicts their guesswork gets demoted. It’s just human nature, but its skewing effect on the design process usually gets overlooked.

The best way to avoid becoming wedded to a detailed product vision or plan is not to have a detailed product vision or plan. Assume as little as possible to make something simple we can learn from in the next go-round. Focus on achieving long-term goals, not on delivering detailed plans.

In simpler terms: ditch the backlogs.

Author: codemanship

Founder of Codemanship Ltd and code craft coach and trainer

One thought on “The Value’s Not In Features, It’s In Learning”

  1. Yep. I commonly see stories scheduled over the next year. Stories detailed enough that they will be assigned to coders.
    That’s not agile. That’s Dark Agile. (“Anti-Agile” is my personal preferred term.)

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