Are Only 1 in 4 Developers Trusted?

Following on from my previous post about Trust & Agility, I ran a straw poll on the @codemanship Twitter account as a sort of litmus test of how much trust organisations put in their developers.

A new monitor is a decision of the same order of magnitude of risk of the proverbial “$100 decision” that I’ve used for many years now when assessing the capacity for trust – and therefore for decentralised decision-making – that agility requires.

If I wanted a new monitor for my home office, that would be entirely my decision. There was, of course, a time when it would not have been. That was when I was a child. If 13-year-old me wanted a new monitor, I would have had to refer that decision up to my parents.

When I got jobs, I made my own money and bought my own monitors. That’s called “being a grown-up”.

I’ve worked in organisations where even junior developers were handed corporate credit cards – with monthly limits – so they could “just go get it”, and not bother management with insignificant details. Smaller decisions get made when they need to be made, and they don’t get caught in a bottleneck. It really works.

So why are 3 out of 4 developers still not trusted to be grown-ups?

UPDATE:

A few people have got in touch giving me the impression that they took this to be literally about buying monitors or about company credit cards. These are just simple examples. They indicate a wider problem often. Developers who I’ve seen wait weeks for a monitor, or a laptop, or a software license, have tended to be the ones who “wanted to do TDD but weren’t allowed”, or who “wanted 20% but the boss said ‘no’ “, or who wanted to go to a conference but it was denied. These tend to be the teams that can’t self-organise to get things done. In my 20 years’ experience of Agile Software Development, the correlation has been very close between teams of developers who have to ask permission for a new monitor – just as an example (IT’S NOT ABOUT BUYING MONITORS!) – and teams who have to ask for permission to automate deployments or to talk to the end users directly.

Author: codemanship

Founder of Codemanship Ltd and code craft coach and trainer

One thought on “Are Only 1 in 4 Developers Trusted?”

  1. A $65 piece of equipment. That’s what our I.T. department will *absolutely not allow* me or any of my peers to have, in spite of obvious need and impact. And believe me, people with *far more obvious business justification* than I have been denied. :-/

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