The Experience Paradox

One sentiment I hear very often from managers is how very difficult it is to hire experienced developers. This, of course, is a self-fulfilling prophecy. If you won’t hire developers without experience, how will inexperienced developers get the jobs they need to gain that experience?

I simultaneously hear from new developers – recent graduates, boot camp survivors, and so on – that they really struggle to land that first development job because they don’t have the experience.

When you hear both of these at the same time, it becomes a conversation. Unfortunately, it’s a conversation conducted from inside soundproof booths, and I’m seeing no signs that this very obvious situation will be squared any time soon.

I guess we have to add it to the list of things that every knows is wrong, but everyone does anyway. (Like adding more developers to teams when the schedule’s slipping.)

Organisations should hire for potential as well as experience. People who have the potential to be good developers can learn from people with experience. It’s a match made in heaven, and the end result is a larger pool of experienced developers. This problem can fix it itself, if we were of a mind to let it. We all know this. So why don’t we do it?

At the other end of the spectrum, I hear many, many managers say “This person is too experienced to be a developer”. And at the same time, I hear many, many very experienced developers struggle to find work. This, too, is a problem that creates itself. Typically, there are two reasons why managers rule out the most experienced developers:

  • They expect to get paid more (because they usually achieve more)
  • They won’t put up with your bulls**t

Less experienced developers may be more malleable in terms of how much – or little – you can pay them, how much unpaid overtime they may be willing to tolerate, and how willing they might be to cut corners when ordered to. They may have yet to learn what their work is really worth to you. They may have yet to experience burnout. They may yet to have lived with a large amount of technical debt.

Developers with 20+ years experience, who’ve been around the block a few times and know the score, don’t fit it into the picture of developers as fungible resources.

By freezing out inexperienced developers and very experienced developers, employers create the exact situation they complain endlessly about – lack of experienced developers. If it were my company and my money on the line, I’d hire developers with decades of experience specifically to mentor the inexperienced developers with potential I’d also be hiring.

Many employers, of course, argue that training up developers is too much of a financial risk. Once they’re good enough, won’t they leave for a better job? The clue is in the question, though. They leave for a better job. Better than the one you’re offering them once they qualify. Don’t just be a stepping stone, be a tropical island – a place they would want to stay and work.

If you think training up developers is going to generate teams of cheaper developers who’ll work harder and longer for less, then – yes – they’ll leave at the first opportunity. Finding a better job won’t be hard.

Author: codemanship

Founder of Codemanship Ltd and code craft coach and trainer

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