Why I Abandoned Business Modeling

So, as you may have gathered, I have a background in model-driven processes. I drank the UML Kool-Aid pretty early on, and by 2000 was a fully paid-up member of the Cult of Boxes And Arrows Solve Every Problem.

The big bucks for us architect types back then – and, probably still – came with a job title called Enterprise Architect. Enterprise Architecture is built on the idea that organisations like businesses are essentially machines, with moving connected parts.

Think of it like a motor car; there was a steering wheel, which executives turn to point the car in the direction they wanted to go. This was connected through various layers of mechanisms – business processes, IT systems, individual applications, actual source code – and segregated into connected vertical slices for different functions within the business, different business locations and so on.

The conceit of EA was that we could connect all those dots and create strategic processes of change where the boss changes a business goal and that decision works its way seamlessly through this multi-layered mechanism, changing processes, reconfiguring departments and teams, rewriting systems and editing code so that the car goes in the desired new direction.

It’s great fun to draw complex picture of how we think a business operates. But it’s also a fantasy. Businesses are not mechanistic or deterministic in this way at all. First of all, modeling a business of any appreciable size requires us to abstract away all the insignificant details. In complex systems, though, there are no such things as “insignificant details”. The tiniest change can push a complex system into a profoundly different order.

And that order emerges spontaneously and unpredictably. I’ve watched some big businesses thrown into chaos by the change of a single line of code in a single IT system, or by moving the canteen to a different floor in HQ.

2001-2003 was a period of significant evolution of my own thinking on this. I realised that no amount of boxes and arrows could truly communicate what a business is really like.

In philosophy, they have this concept of qualia – individual instances of subjective, conscious experience. Consider this thought experiment: you’re locked in a tower on a remote island. Everything in it is black and white. The tower has an extensive library of thousands of books that describe everything you could possibly need to know about the colour orange. You have studied the entire contents of that library, and are now the world’s leading authority on orange.

Then, one day, you are released from your tower and allowed to see the world. The first thing you do, naturally, is go and find an orange. When you see the colour orange for the first time – given that you’ve read everything there is to know about it – are you surprised?

Two seminal professional experiences I had in 2002-2004 convinced me that you cannot truly understand a business without seeing and experiencing it for yourself. In both cases, we’d had teams of business analysts writing documents, creating glossaries, and drawing boxes and arrows galore to explain the organisational context in which our software was intended to be used.

I speak box-and-arrow fluently, but I just wasn’t getting it. So many hidden details, so many unanswered questions. So, after months of going round in circles delivering software that didn’t fit, I said “Enough’s enough” and we piled into a minibus and went to the “shop floor” to see these processes for ourselves. The mist cleared almost immediately.

Reality is very, very complicated. All we know about conscious experience suggests that our brains are only truly capable of understanding complex things from first-hand experience of them. We have to see them and experience them for ourselves. Accept no substitutes.

Since then, my approach to strategic systems development has been one of gaining first-hand experience of a problem, and trying simple things we believe might solve those problems, seeing and measuring what effect they have, and feeding back into the next attempt.

Basically, I replaced Enterprise Architecture with agility. Up to that point, I’d viewed Agile as a way of delivering software. I was already XP’d up to the eyeballs, but hadn’t really looked beyond Extreme Programming to appreciate its potential strategic role in the evolution of a business. There have to be processes outside of XP that connect business feedback cycles to software delivery cycles. And that’s how I do it (and teach it) now.

Don’t start with features. Start with a problem. Design the simplest solution you can think of that might solve that problem, and make it available for real-world testing as soon as you can. Observe (and experience) the solution being used in the real world. Feed back lessons learned and go round again with an evolution of your solution. Rinse and repeat until the problem’s solved (my definition of “done”). Then move on to the next problem.

The chief differences between Enterprise Architecture and this approach are that:

a. We don’t make big changes. In complex adaptive systems, big changes != big results. You can completely pull a complex system out of shape, and over time the underlying – often unspoken – rule of the system (the “insignificant details” your boxes and arrows left out, usually) will bring it back to its original order. I’ve watched countless big change programmes produce no lasting, meaningful change.

b. We begin and end in the real world

In particular, I’ve learned from experience that the smallest changes can have the largest impact. We instinctively believe that to effect change at scale, we must scale our approach. Nothing could be further from the truth. A change to a single line of code can cause chaos at airport check-ins and bring traffic in an entire city to a standstill. Enterprise Architecture gave us the illusion of control over the effects of changes, because it gave us the illusion of understanding.

But that’s all it ever was: an illusion.

Author: codemanship

Founder of Codemanship Ltd and code craft coach and trainer

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