Is Your Agile Transformation Just ‘Agility Theatre’?

I’ve talked before about what I consider to be the two most important feedback loops in software development.

When I explain the feedback loops – the “gears” – of Test-Driven Development, I go to great pains to highlight which of those gears matter most, in terms of affecting our odds of success.

tdd_gears

Customer or business goals drive the whole machine of delivery – or at least, they should. We are not done because we passed some acceptance tests, or because a feature is in production. We’re only done when we’ve solved the customer’s problem.

That’s very likely going to require more than one go-around. Which is why the second most important feedback loop is the one that establishes if we’re good to go for the next release.

The ability to establish quickly and effectively if the changes we made to the software have broken it is critical to our ability to release it. Teams who rely on manual regression testing can take weeks to establish this, and their release cycles are inevitably very slow. Teams who rely mostly on automated system and integration tests have faster release cycles, but still usually far too slow for them to claim to be “agile”. Teams who can re-test most of the code in under a minute are able to release as often as the customer wants – many times a day, if need be.

The speed of regression testing – of establishing if our software still works – dictates whether our release cycles span months, weeks, or hours. It determines the metabolism of our delivery cycle and ultimately how many throws of the dice we get at solving the customer’s problem.

It’s as simple as that: faster tests = more throws of the dice.

If the essence of agility is responding to change, then I conclude that fast-running automated tests lie at the heart of that.

What’s odd is how so many “Agile transformations” seem to focus on everything but that. User stories don’t make you responsive to change. Daily stand-ups don’t make you responsive to change. Burn-down charts don’t make you responsive to change. Kanban boards don’t make you responsive to change. Pair programming doesn’t make you responsive to change.

It’s all just Agility Theatre if you’re not addressing the two must fundamental feedback loops, which the majority of organisations simply don’t. Their definition of done is “It’s in production”, as they work their way through a list of features instead of trying to solve a real business problem. And they all too often under-invest in the skills and the time needed to wrap software in good fast-running tests, seeing that as less important than the index cards and the Post-It notes and the Jira tickets.

I talk often with managers tasked with “Agilifying” legacy IT (e.g., mainframe COBOL systems). This means speeding up feedback cycles, which means speeding up delivery cycles, which means speeding up build pipelines, which – 99.9% of the time – means speeding up testing.

After version control, it’s #2 on my list of How To Be More Agile. And, very importantly, it works. But then, we shouldn’t be surprised that it does. Maths and nature teach us that it should. How fast do bacteria or fruit flies evolve – with very rapid “release cycles” of new generations – vs elephants or whales, whose evolutionary feedback cycles take decades?

There are two kinds of Agile consultant: those who’ll teach you Agility Theatre, and those who’ll shrink your feedback cycles. Non-programmers can’t help you with the latter, because the speed of the delivery cycle is largely determined by test execution time. Speeding up tests requires programming, as well as knowledge and experience of designing software for testability.

70% of Agile coaches are non-programmers. A further 20% are ex-programmers who haven’t touched code for over a decade. (According to the hundreds of CVs I’ve seen.) That suggests that 90% of Agile coaches are teaching Agility Theatre, and maybe 10% are actually helping teams speed up their feedback cycles in any practical sense.

It also strongly suggests that most Agile transformations have a major imbalance; investing heavily in the theatre, but little if anything in speeding up delivery cycles.

Author: codemanship

Founder of Codemanship Ltd and code craft coach and trainer

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s