Where’s User Experience In Your Development Process?

I ran a little poll through the Codemanship twitter account yesterday, and thought I’d share the result with you.

There are two things that strike me about the results. Firstly, it looks like teams who actively involve user experience experts throughout the design process are very much in the minority. To be honest, this comes as no great surprise. My own observations of development teams over years tend to see UXD folks getting involved early on – often before any developers are involved, or any customer tests have been discussed – in a kind of a Waterfall fashion. “We’re agile. But the user interface design must not change.”

To me, this is as nonsensical as those times when I’ve arrived on a project that has no use cases or customer tests, but somehow magically has a very fleshed-out database schema that we are not allowed to change.

Let’s be clear about this: the purpose of the user experience is to enable the user to achieve their goals. That is a discussion for everybody involved in the design process. It’s also something that is unlikely we’ll get right first time, so iterating the UXD multiple times with the benefit of end user feedback almost certainly will be necessary.

The most effective teams do not organise themselves into functional silos of requirements analysis, UXD, architecture, programming, security, data management, testing, release and operations & support and so on, throwing some kind of output (a use case, a wireframe, a UML diagram, source code, etc) over the wall to the next function.

The most effective teams organise themselves around achieving a goal. Whoever’s needed to deliver on that should be in the room – especially when those goals are being discussed and agreed.

I could have worded the question in my poll “User Experience Designers: when you explore user goals, how often are the developers involved?” I suspect the results would have been similar. Because it’s the same discussion.

On a movie production, you have people who write scripts, people who say the lines, people who create sets, people who design costumes, and so on. But, whatever their function, they are all telling the same story.

The realisation of working software requires multiple disciplines, and all of them should be serving the story. The best teams recognise this, and involve all of the disciplines early and throughout the process.

But, sadly, this still seems quite rare. I hear lip service being paid, but see little concrete evidence that it’s actually going on.

The second thing I noticed about this poll is that, despite several retweets, the response is actually pretty low compared to previous polls. This, I suspect, also tells a story. I know from both observation and from polls that teams who actively engage with their customers – let alone UXD professionals etc – in their BDD/ATDD process are a small minority (maybe about 20%). Most teams write the “customer tests” themselves, and mistake using a BDD tool like Cucumber for actually doing BDD.

But I also get a distinct sense, working with many dev teams, that UXD just isn’t on their radar. That is somebody else’s problem. This is a major, major miscalculation – every bit as much as believing that quality assurance is somebody else’s problem. Any line of code that doesn’t in some way change the user’s experience – and I use the term “user” in the wider sense that includes, for example, people supporting the software in production, who will have their own user experience – is a line of code that should be deleted. Who is it for? Whose story does it serve?

We are all involved in creating the user experience. Bad special effects can ruin a movie, you know.

We may not all be qualified in UXD, of course. And that’s why the experts need to be involved in the ongoing design process, because UX decisions are being taken throughout development. It only ends when the software ends (and even that process – decommissioning – is a user experience).

Likewise, every decision a UI designer takes will have technical implications, and they may not be the experts in that. Which is why the other disciplines need to be involved from the start. It’s very easy to write a throwaway line in your movie script like “Oh look, it’s Bill, and he’s brought 100,000 giant fighting robots with him”, but writing 100,000 giant fighting robots and making 100,000 giant fighting robots actually appear on the screen are two very different propositions.

So let’s move on from the days of developers being handed wire-frames and told to “code this up”, and from developers squeezing input validation error messages into random parts of web forms, and bring these – and all the other – disciplines together into what I would call a “development team”.

Author: codemanship

Founder of Codemanship Ltd and code craft coach and trainer

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