Leading By Example

We’re used to the idea of leaders saying “Do as I say, not as I do”. Politicians, for example, are notorious for their double standards.

But the long-term effect of leaders not being seen to “eat their own dog food” is that it undermines the faith of those being led in their leaders and in their policies.

When we see public servants avoiding tax, we assume “Well, if it’s good enough for them…”, and before you know it you’ve got industrial-scale tax avoidance going on.

When we see government advisors breaking their own lockdown rules, we think “Actually, I quite fancy a trip to Barnard’s Castle”, and before you know it, lockdown has broken down.

When we see self-proclaimed socialists sending their children to private schools, we think “Obviously, state schools must be a bit crap” and start ordering prospectuses for Eton and Harrow.

And when we see lead developers who don’t follow their own advice, we naturally assume that the advice doesn’t apply to any of us.

If you want your team to write tests first, write your tests first. If you want your team to merge to trunk frequently, merge to trunk frequently. If you want your team to be kind in code reviews, be kind in your code reviews.

As Gandhi once put it: be the change you want to see in the world. Be the developer you want to see on your team.

This means that, among the many qualities that make a good lead developer, the willingness to roll up your sleeves and lead from the front is essential. Teams can see when the rules you impose on them don’t seem to apply to you, and it undermines those rules and your authority. That authority has to be earned.

This is why I’ve made damn sure that every single idea people learn on a Codemanship course – even the more “out there” ideas – is something I’ve applied successfully on real teams, and why I demonstrate rather than just present those ideas whenever possible. You can make any old nonsense seem viable on a PowerPoint slide.

As a trainer and mentor – and mentoring is a large part of leading a development team – I choose to lead by example because, after 3 decades working with developers, I’ve found that to be most effective. Don’t tell them. Show them.

This puts an onus on lead developers to do the legwork when new ideas and unfamiliar technologies need to be explored. If you need to get your legacy COBOL programmers writing unit tests, then it’s time to learn some COBOL and write some COBOL unit tests. This is another kind of leading by example. Getting out of your comfort zone can serve as an example for teams who are maybe just a little too comfortable in theirs.

And this extends beyond programming languages and technical practices. If you believe your team need a better work-life balance, don’t mandate a better work-life balances and then stay at your desk until 8pm every day. Go home at 5:30pm. Show them it’s fine to do that. Show them it’s fine to learn new skills during office hours. Show them it’s fine to switch your phone off and not check your emails when you’re on holiday. Show them that you don’t marginalise people on your team because of, say, their gender or ethnic background. Show them that you don’t act inappropriately at the Christmas party. Show them that you actively consider questions of ethics in your work.

Whatever it is you want the team to be, that’s what you need to be, because there are far too many people saying and not doing in this world.

Author: codemanship

Founder of Codemanship Ltd and code craft coach and trainer

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