Don’t Succumb To Illusions Of Productivity

One thing I come across very often is development teams who have adopted processes or practices that they believe are helping them go faster, but that are probably making no difference, or even slowing them down.

The illusion of productivity can be very seductive. When I bash out code without writing tests, or without refactoring, it really feels like I’m getting sh*t done. But when I measure my progress more objectively, it turns out I’m not.

That could be because typing code faster – without all those pesky interruptions – feels like delivering working software faster. But it usually takes longer to get something working when we take less care.

We seem hardwired not to notice how much time we spend fixing stuff later that didn’t need to be broken. We seem hardwired not to notice the team getting bigger and bigger as the bug count and the code smells and the technical debt pile up. We seem hardwired not to notice the merge hell we seem to end up in every week as developers try to get their changes into the trunk.

We just feel like…

Getting sh*t done

Not writing automated tests is one classic example. I mean, of course unit tests slow us down! It’s, like, twice as much code! The reality, though, is that without fast-running regression tests, we usually end up spending most of our time fixing bugs when we could be adding value to the product. The downstream costs typically outweigh the up-front investment in unit tests. Skipping tests is almost always a false economy, even on relatively short projects. I’ve measured myself with and without unit tests, and on ~1 hour exercises, and I’m slightly faster with them. Typing is not the bottleneck.

Another example is when teams mistakenly believe that working on separate branches of the code will reduce bottlenecks in their delivery pipelines. Again, it feels like we’re getting more done as we hack away in our own isolated sandboxes. But this, too, is an illusion. It doesn’t matter how many lanes the motorway has if every vehicle has to drive on to the same ferry at the end of it. No matter how many parallel dev branches you have, there’s only one branch deployments can be made from, and all those parallel changes have to somehow make it into that branch eventually. And the less often developers merge, the more changes in each merge. And the more changes in each merge, the more conflicts. And, hey presto, merge hell.

Closely related is the desire of many developers to work without “interruptions”. It may feel like sh*t’s getting done when the developers go off into their cubicles, stick their noise-cancelling headphones on, and hunker down on a problem. But you’d be surprised just how much communication and coordination’s required to avoid some serious misunderstandings. I recall working on a team where we ended up with three different architectures and four customer tables in the database, because my colleagues felt that standing around a whiteboard drawing pictures – or, as they called it, “meetings” – was a waste of valuable Getting Sh*t Done time. With just a couple of weeks of corrective work, we were able to save ourselves 20 minutes around a whiteboard. Go us!

I guess my message is simple. In software development, productivity doesn’t look like this:

Don’t be fooled by that illusion.

Author: codemanship

Founder of Codemanship Ltd and code craft coach and trainer

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