Training Is Expensive. But Not As Expensive As Not Training.

However they choose to learn – from books, videos, blogs, online courses, instructor-led training, etc – by far the biggest cost in building a developer’s skills is the time that it takes.

I’ve worked with several thousand developers in more than 100 organisations over the last decade, so I have a perspective on how much time is really required. If you’re a manager, you may want to sit down for this.

Let’s start from scratch – a newly-minted programmer, just starting out in their dev career. They may have been programming for 6-12 months, perhaps at school or in a code club, or at home with a couple of books.

At this point, they’re a long way from being competent enough to be left alone to get on with writing real software for real end users in a real business. Typically, we find that it takes another 2-3 years. Before then, they’re going to need a lot of supervision – almost continuous – from a more experienced developer.

Of course, you could just leave them to their own devices, freeing up that more productive mentor to write their own code. But we know that the cost of maintaining code over its lifetime is an order of magnitude higher than the cost of writing it in the first place. An inexperienced developer’s code is likely to be far less maintainable, and therefore cost far more to live with.

This is the first hidden cost of learning, and it’s a big one.

But it’s not just about maintainability of code, of course. Inexperienced developers are less likely to know how to pin down requirements, and therefore more likely to build the wrong things, requiring larger amounts of rework. And this is rework of code that’s harder to change, so it’s expensive rework.

More mature organisations recognise this, and invest more to get their developers up to speed sooner. (Many developers, sadly, never learn to write maintainable code at any point in their career – it’s pot luck if you happen to end up being exposed to good practices).

Or you could exclusively hire more experienced developers, of course. But that plan has two fatal flaws. Firstly, hiring developers is very expensive and takes months. Secondly, if nobody hires inexperienced developers, where will these experienced developers come from?

So, you end up paying the piper one way or another. You can pay him for training. Or you can pay him for constant supervision. Or you can pay him for bug fixes and rework. Or you can pay him to try and recruit senior developers.

It turns out that training – I mean, really training – your developers is the cheapest option. It’s also the option least chosen.

On paper, it sounds like a huge investment. Some development organisations spend as much as 25% of their entire budget on learning and improving. Most organisations balk at this. It’s too much!

The lion’s share of this manifests in the developers’ time. They might, for example, give developers one day a week dedicated to learning and improving (and, as they become more senior, researching and experimenting). For a team of 6 developers, that adds up to £140,000 a year of developer time.

They might send teams on training courses. A group of 12 – the average Codemanship class size – on a 3-day course represents approximately £16,000 of dev time here in London.

These are some pretty big numbers. But only when you consider them without the context of the total you’re spending on development, and more importantly, the return your organisation gets from that total investment.

I often see organisations – of all sizes and shapes – brought to their knees by legacy products and systems, and their inability to change them, and therefore to change the way they do business.

Think not about the 25%. Think instead about what you’re getting from the other 75%.

Author: codemanship

Founder of Codemanship Ltd and code craft coach and trainer

One thought on “Training Is Expensive. But Not As Expensive As Not Training.”

  1. There’s a third fatal flaw to hiring more experienced developers: As you state in the previous paragraph, “Many developers, sadly, never learn to write maintainable code at any point in their career – it’s pot luck if you happen to end up being exposed to good practices”. So just because they have years of “experience,” does not mean that they’ve learned to write maintainable code. Or really any of the other skills you need them to have.

    The only way to ensure that your people have the knowledge, skills, and abilities to do everything you need, is to ensure that they are properly trained *by you* in *exactly the things you need.*

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