What Is ‘Leadership’ Anyway?

If you spend any time on LinkedIn you’re likely to bump into content about this thing called “leadership”. Many posters fancy themselves as experts in this mysterious quality. Many promote themselves as professional “leaders”.

I’m sure you won’t be surprised to learn that I think this is nonsense. And now I’m going to tell you why.

Leading Is Not What You Think It Is?

Let’s think of what that word means: “Lead the way”, “Follow my lead”, “Tonight’s leading news story”, “Mo Farah is in the lead”.

When you lead, it usually means that you go first.

Leading is distinctly different from commanding or inspiring, but that’s what many professional “leaders” mistake it for.

Leaders don’t tell people where to go. They show people the way by going first.

I don’t tell people to write their tests first. I write my tests first and show them how. I lead by example.

‘Leader’ Is Not A Job Title

Organisations appoint what they believe to be good leaders into roles where leading by example is difficult, if not impossible. They give them titles like “Head of” and “Director of” and “Chief” and then promote them away from any activity where they would have the time to show rather than tell.

The real leaders are still on the shop floor. It’s the only place they can lead from.

And, as we’ve probably all experienced, promoting the people who could set the best example into roles where they can’t show instead of tell is a very common anti-pattern.

We Are Not Your Flock

Another common mistake is to see leadership as some kind of pastoral care. Now, I’m not going to suggest that organisations shouldn’t take an interest in the welfare of their people. Not just because happy workers make better workers, but because they are people, and therefore it’s the right thing to do.

And executives could set examples – like work-life balance, like the way they treat people at all levels of the corporate ladder, and like how much they pay people (yeah, I’m looking at you, gig economy) – but that’s different to the way many of them perceive that role.

Often, they’re more like religious leaders, espousing principles for their followers to live by, while indulging in drug-fuelled orgies and embezzling the church’s coffers.

And the care that most people need at work is simply to not make their lives worse. If you let them, grown-ups will grown-up. They can buy their own massage chair if they want one. Nothing more disheartening than watching managers impose their ideas about well-being on to actual adults who are allowed to drink and drive and vote.

If people are having problems, and need help and understanding, then be there for that. Don’t make me go to paintball. I don’t need it, thanks.

The Big Bucks

Most developers I know who moved into those “leadership” roles knew it was a mistake at the time – for the organisation and for themselves – but they took the promotion anyway. Because “leadership” is where the big bucks are.

The average UK salary for a CTO is £85,000. For a senior developer, it’s £60,000 (source: itjobswatch.co.uk). But how senior is “senior”? I’m quite a senior developer. Most CTOs are junior by comparison.

And in most cases, CTO is a strategic command – not a leadership – role (something I freely admit I suck at). A CTO cannot lead in the way I can, because I set an example for a living. For all I know, there are teams out there I’ve never even met who’ve been influenced more by me than by their CTO.

‘Leader’ Is A Relative Term

When I’ve been put in charge of development teams, I make a point of not asking developers to do anything I’m not prepared to at least try myself, and this means I’m having to learn new things all the time. Often I’m out of my comfort zone, and in those instances I need leadership. I need someone to show me the way.

Leadership is a relationship, not a role. It’s relative. When I follow you, and do as you do, then you are the leader. When you do as I do, I’m the leader.

In the course of our working day, we may lead, and we may follow. When we’re inexperienced, we may follow more than we lead. But every time you’ve shown someone how you do something and they’ve started to do it too, you’re a leader.

Yes, I know. That sounds like teaching. Funny, that.

But it doesn’t have to be an explicit teacher-student relationship. Every time you read someone’s code and think “Oh, that’s cool. I’m going to try that”, you have been led.

It’s lonely at the top

For sure, there are many ways a CxO could lead by example – by working reasonable hours, by not answering emails or taking calls on holidays, by putting their trust in their people, or by treating everyone with respect. That’s a rare (and beautiful) thing. But it’s the nature of heirarchies that those kinds of people tend not to get ahead. And it’s very difficult to lead by example from a higher strata. If a CTO leaves the office at 5:30pm, but none of her 5,000 employees actually sees it, does it make a sound?

Show, Don’t Tell

So, leadership is a very distinct thing from command. When you tell someone to do something, you’re commanding. When you show them how you do it – when you go first – that’s leading.

“Show, don’t tell” would be – if it had one – Codemanship’s mission statement. Right from the start, I’ve made a point of demonstrating – and not presenting – ideas. The PowerPoint content of Codemanship training courses has diminished to the point of almost non-existent over the last 12 years.

And in that sense, I started Codemanship to provide a kind of leadership: the kind a CTO or VP of Engineering can’t.

Set Your Leaders Free

I come across so many organisations who lack technical leadership. Usually this happens because of the first mistake – the original sin, if you like – of promoting the people who could be setting a good example into roles where they no longer can, and then compounding that mistake by stripping authority and autonomy from people below that pay grade – because “Well, that’s leadership taken care of”.

I provide a surrogate technical leadership service that shouldn’t need to exist. I’m the CTO who never took that promotion and has time – and up-to-date skills – to show you how to refactor a switch statement. I know people who market themselves as an “Interim CTO”. Well, I’m the Interim Old Programmer Who’s Been Around Forever.

I set myself free by taking an alternative career path – starting my own company. I provide the workshops and the brown bag sessions and the mobbing sessions and the screencasts and the blog posts that you could be creating and sharing within your organisation, if only they’d let you.

If only they’d trust you: trust you to manage your own time and organise things the way you think will work best – not just for getting things done, but for learning how to do them better.

People working in silos, keeping their heads down, is antithetical to effective leadership. Good ideas tend to stay in their silos. And my long experience has taught me that broadcasting these ideas from on-high simply changes nothing.

Oh, The Irony

I believe this is a pretty fundamental dysfunction in organisational life. We don’t just have this problem in tech: we see it repeated in pretty much every industry.

Is there a cure? I believe so, and I’ve seen and been involved with companies who’ve managed to open up the idea of leadership and give their people the trust and the autonomy (and the resources) to eventually provide their own internal technical leadership that is self-sustaining.

But they are – if I’m being honest – in the minority. Training and mentoring from someone like me is more likely to lead to your newly inspired, more highly skilled people moving on to a company where they do get trust and autonomy.

This is why I warn clients that “If you water the plant, eventually it’ll need a bigger pot”. And if pushed to describe what I do, I tell them “I train developers for their next job”. Would that it were not so, but I have no control over that.

Because I’m not in charge.

Author: codemanship

Founder of Codemanship Ltd and code craft coach and trainer

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